Companies with insider buying separated by who, how many, and how much. The reports on this page focus on the three key variables used to evaluate insider purchases:
  • Who: Follow insiders with a track record of success and top executives
  • Consensus: How many insiders are buying
  • Commitment: How much are they buying
corePurchase SummaryPurchaseSuccessful Insider PurchasesSuccessful Insider Successful insiders who have made the largest open market purchases. A successful insider is one who has gained on average at least 10% within 6 months on their past purchases. Insiders who have consistently done well in the past are likely to do so in the future. C-Level PurchasesC-Level Companies with the greatest amount of purchasing by C-Level executives (CEO, CFO, COO, etc.). These insiders have the best insight into their companies and markets and have historically been among the best to follow. Consensus PurchasesConsensus Companies with the greatest amount of purchasing by two or more insiders. Significant purchases by multiple insiders at the same company shows that they have come to the same opinion, namely that they think the price will rise. Largest PurchasesLargest Companies with the greatest amount of purchasing by insiders. When insiders feel they have a better chance to make a profit on their own company's stock, they invest more.
Companies with insider buying that are currently trading at potentially attractive valuations. Value investors seeking to profit from stocks that trade below their intrinsic value would find a number of great opportunities from the following reports. After all, who better to assess the value of the company than its own insiders? specialtyValue SummaryValueLow Price/Earning PurchasesLow Price/Earning Largest purchases at companies with price/earnings ratio of 12 or less. Companies with low P/E ratios traditionally have limited downside, and when coupled with bullish insider buying may indicate good investment opportunities. Low Price/Book PurchasesLow Price/Book Largest purchases at companies with price/book ratio of 1 or less. Companies with a P/B ratio below 1 in theory could be bought and liquidated for a profit, meaning that the stock price has extremely limited downside. When coupled with bullish insider buying, this may indicate good investment opportunities. Low Price/Sales PurchasesLow Price/Sales Largest purchases at companies with price/sales ratio of 1 or less. Companies with low P/S ratios traditionally have limited downside, and when coupled with bullish insider buying may indicate good investment opportunities. High Dividend Yield PurchasesHigh Dividend Yield Largest purchases at companies with a dividend yield of 4% or more. Companies with high dividend yields offer protection against stock price declines, and when coupled with bullish insider buying may indicate good investment opportunities. Companies with insider buying where the insiders could be taking advantage of an overreaction by the market. Contrarian investors look to invest against the trend. When a stock price plunges on bad news and investors rush to sell, contrarians see an opportunity to exploit market's overreaction. When insiders in such stocks are buying, there is a good chance that the stock price is due for a recovery. specialtyContrarian SummaryContrarianDown by Half PurchasesDown by Half Largest purchases at companies trading at 50% or less of their 52-week high. When the market over-reacts to a negative event and causes a significant drop in the stock price, insiders may buy on the dip to reap a profit on the rebound. 52-Week Low Purchases52-Week Low Largest purchases at companies trading within 10% of their 52-week low. Companies trading near their 52-week lows traditionally have limited downside, and when coupled with bullish insider buying may indicate good investment opportunities. Companies with insider selling separated by who, how many, and how much. Insider selling is not an automatic indicator of a trouble: insiders commonly receive a large portion of their compensation in stock and can have many reasons to sell. Look deeper to see if the selling is within historical norms or if it is a significant change in behavior, potentially signalling trouble ahead coreSales SummarySalesSuccessful Insider SalesSuccessful Insider Successful insiders who have made the largest open market sales. A successful insider is one who has saved on average at least 10% within 6 months on their past sales. C-Level SalesC-Level Companies with the greatest amount of selling by C-Level executives (CEO, CFO, COO, etc.). Consensus SalesConsensus Companies with the greatest amount of selling by two or more insiders. Largest SalesLargest Companies with the greatest amount of selling by insiders. Companies with insider selling that may signal decreased insider confidence. While insider selling is not a automatic sign of trouble, the following reports hightlight insider behavior that warrants a second look. These unusual sales in terms of size or timing may signal decreased insider confidence in their companies. specialtyShort Seller SummaryShort SellerLarge Change in Holdings SalesLarge Change in Holdings Largest sales at companies where insiders have sold 5% of their holdings. Significant individual insider selling signals a bearish opinion about the company's future prospects. 52-Week Low Sales52-Week Low Largest sales at companies trading within 10% of their 52-week low. Insider selling when the stock at or near historic lows may indicate low confidence in a future turnaround. 52-Week High Sales52-Week High Largest sales at companies trading within 10% of their 52-week high. Selling at or near historic highs may indicate that insiders believe that the market has overvalued a company.